Experience African-American History in Charleston, S.C., This Winter

For Immediate Release, January 2012


EXPERIENCE AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY
IN THE CHARLESTON AREA THIS FEBRURARY AND MARCH 2012

The Charleston area is one of the nation’s premier places to experience African-American history. Visitors may immerse themselves in the sights, sounds and food related to the area’s indigenous Gullah heritage, a culture that melds African, Bahamian, and Colonial Era South traditions. Hallmarks of Gullah include sweetgrass basket weaving techniques, shrimp and grits recipes as well as spiritual music.

While Charleston’s African-American history can be appreciated year-round in museums and historic walking tours, special celebrations take place during Black History Month. For a complete listing of Charleston area attractions, special events, lodging and packages, please visit explorecharleston.com.


SPIRITUALS CONCERTS

On February 4, the Charleston Symphony Orchestra Spiritual Ensemble, a 35 member vocal group that continues the Lowcountry tradition of African-American spirituals, will perform Moses, Let My People Go, a moving tribute to the founder and conductor of the Moses Hogan Chorale.

Saturday, February 4, 2012; 6 p.m.
Trinity United Methodist Church
273 Meeting Street, Charleston, S.C.
Tickets: $20 adults; children or students $10 with ID
(866) 811-4111, csospiritual.com


On February 11, the Charleston Symphony Orchestra Spiritual Ensemble will perform Pure Gospel: Authentic Reflections II.

Saturday, February 11, 2012; 5 p.m.
Calvary Baptist Church
620 Rutledge Avenue, Charleston, S.C.
Tickets: $25 adults; children or students $15 with ID
(866) 811-4111, csospiritual.com


CULTURAL PROGRAMS

Every Saturday afternoon in February and March, the National Park Service will present a free cultural program at Charles Pinckney National Historic site. Program topics range from sweetgrass basket demonstrations to storytelling.

Every Saturday in February and March; 2 p.m.
Charles Pinckney National Historic Site
1254 Long Point Road, Mount Pleasant, S.C.
(843) 881-5516, nps.gov/chpi


On February 11, explore the role of Gullah culture in American history with a multisensory morning at the Charleston Museum. The program will feature a performance by Andande African Drum and Dance Group, a scavenger hunt and a sweetgrass basket display.

Saturday, February 11, 2012; 10 a.m. – noon
Charleston Museum
360 Meeting Street, Charleston, S.C.
(843) 722-2996, charlestonmuseum.org



EXHIBITIONS

Developed by the Smithsonian Institution’s Anacostia Community Museum, Word, Shout, Song is a thought-provoking assemblage of artifacts, photographs and text documents the life and work of Dr. Lorenzo Dow Turner, considered the first African-American linguist. By cracking the linguistic code of the Gullah language of the Lowcountry, Dr. Turner garnered international attention to the sea island ways of life and validated Gullah culture and dialect as a complex Creole language melded from African, European and Native American languages.

Monday – Friday; 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Avery Research Center
125 Bull Street, Charleston, S.C.
(843) 953-7609, avery.cofc.edu


First constructed in 1859, the Old Slave Mart Museum—a former slave auction gallery— houses a premier collection of African American artifacts that document the trans-Atlantic slave trade between the 15th and early 19th centuries.

Monday – Saturday; 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Old Slave Mart Museum
6 Chalmers Street, Charleston, S.C.
(843) 958-6467

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The mission of the Charleston Area Convention & Visitors Bureau is to unify and lead the local travel industry in marketing the Charleston area as an individual, meeting, incentive and group destination to both the domestic and international markets.

For more information on Charleston’s African-American heritage visit www.AfricanAmericanCharleston.com

media@explorecharleston.com